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New Year's Resolution: KINDNESS in the face of UNCERTAINTY.

Or, three ways to drift clumsily towards kindness and avoid paralytic handwringer’s disease.

This year, I will give whatever I have, whenever I can. 

I am often paralyzed by the thought that there is so much going wrong in the world - so many injustices and tragedies, large and small, life-threatening and soul-crushing, chewing up people and hope in every imaginable way - and I’m just one small, uneducated, brokeass person, wrapped up in my own daily dramas, whimpering in the face of the beast.

I don’t know which tragedy to face first, or how to face it, so I sit at home and wring my hands, and feel a little guilty but mostly confused. It’s like I’m waiting for somebody to swoop in and tell me what form of kindness has the highest Overall Statistical Goodness Quotient, and until that happens, being kind is probably a waste of time and energy.

I’ve considered quitting the music biz and working for a nonprofit, or trying harder to be a real rockstar so I can get rich and give away my money, or going to school for something important. But honestly, I don’t think any of those things would turn me into an unconflicted superhero of change (and also, I would be miserable). None of us is big enough or rich enough or smart enough to save the world, that’s just the dangblasted human condition.

So this year, I declare that the way to make change is to give whatever I have, whenever I can, and to inspire other people to do the same.

Below are some concrete steps I’ll be taking this year to make change. I invite you to join me.

MONEY: I have more of it than most people on earth, and so do you.

In these past eightish years of full-time musicianhood, I have wriggled my way onto the lower rungs of the middle class, tooth and nail. I don’t make a lot of money, but I make a little more than I need. By that I mean: I am pretty sure I’ll be able to eat, and continue to live in my house, pretty much every month. What’s more: I make that money doing something that I am really, truly happy to do. As far as I’m concerned, that puts me in the 1%, and means that I have a karmic obligation to give away every penny I can part with.

Speaking of what I can part with: studies have shown that money doesn’t get easier to give away when you make more of it. In fact, in America the reverse is true: the poorest people give the most of their income to charity, and the richest people give the least. To me, this means that I have to get in the habit of giving now, even if it feels like a stretch, just in case I do become a real rockstar.

WHAT I’M DOING ABOUT IT THIS YEAR: Setting up a $15/month automatic donation to Kiva, an organization that facilitates small loans (the average loan size is $435) to entrepreneurs in developing countries.

I’ve targeted my donation to female business-owners, because women invest 80% of their income in their families and communities. I’ve also set it up to redistribute any re-paid loans (Kiva loans have a 98.7% repayment rate) to other borrowers, so every dollar I give can be re-used many times.

BRAINPOWER: When I am uninformed about something that feels important, I will get informed.

This past year, I’ve been following the news of racial profiling and police brutality in the US, with alternating feelings of horror and helplessness. I live in a neighborhood that is majority black, in a city that is majority black, policed by a department that is widely considered to be corrupt, disorganized, and openly racist (my local dealings with them so far confirm the rumors). Not to mention, my state has the highest incarceration rate in the entire world (yep - it’s higher than China, Iran, or North Korea). 

Sometimes I feel like it’s “not my issue”, because I’m not black. Other times, that rationale sounds a lot like “I was just following orders”. In other words, I don’t want laziness or confusion to make me complicit in a culture that’s ravaging, ruining, and ending people’s lives. I want to learn how I can be helpful to my fellow citizens in a way that is respectful and informed.

WHAT I’M DOING ABOUT IT THIS YEAR: Embarking on a massive research project about the history of race relations in America, and the mechanisms by which institutionalized racism functions in the present day.

I’m reading these books: A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America, and The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

And going to this workshop: Undoing Racism (at the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond). I’ll be attending the one in New Orleans January 16-18.

WORDS: I know how to use ‘em.

As you’ve probably noticed, I’m a feminist. That means I want more female Presidents and CEOs, and I want girls and women around the world to have the same access to education and resources as boys and men. But also, I think misogyny is creepier and more insidious than those goals imply, and that addressing only the large-scale, identifiable problems will not pull it out at the root. One of my personal causes is self-expression and empowerment for myself and the women around me, as a form of social activism.

In the past few years, I’ve noticed that some of the ways I relate to other women are subtly disempowering. For example: I habitually compliment girls and women on the way they look - in lieu of more thoughtful observations - and I don’t have the same reflex when talking to boys and men. I think this reinforces the cultural assumption that the most important thing a woman has to offer is her body: how she looks, and how she chooses to decorate herself.

WHAT I’M DOING ABOUT IT THIS YEAR: I’m going to stop complimenting young girls on the way they look – especially if they are kids (because that’s crazy! It’s like we say to six year olds, “welcome to being a girl! The only important thing about you is your clothes, and how cute you are.”) When I feel the impulse to do that, I will find a more interesting way to engage.

When I feel the urge to compliment another woman on how she looks, I’ll work to integrate it into a larger understanding of her as a person (ie: “Your hair looks great!” will become “I love your haircut, it is elegant and wacky at the same time, like you!”). Bonus: fight the patriarchy while ALSO learning to give much more interesting compliments.

In summation: this year I’ll be doing to do my best to avoid paralytic handwringer’s disease.  

This includes the above efforts, but it may also include giving change to panhandlers, cooking food for my neighbors, picking up trash, and sending stuffed animals to my friends when they are sad. I reserve the right to give whatever I have, whenever I can, whether or not I can determine its Overall Statistical Goodness Quotient.

There is no “best” way to be kind. Kindness is not a statistical event; it’s a state of being. This year, I’ll be drifting clumsily towards it. Join me?

GIVE TO KIVA: http://www.kiva.org/

BUY THESE BOOKS: A Dreadful Deceit, The New Jim Crow

GO TO A WORKSHOP: http://www.pisab.org/news-events/workshop-calendar

TELL A KID SHE’S SMART AND FUNNY: there’s no link for that one.



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My Kind of Feminism

I am a feminist.

I thought this would be an appropriate time to jump on the bandwagon, along with Taylor Swift and Beyonce (heck, I’ll jump on any bandwagon Beyonce’s on). That said, I notice that my personal take on feminism does not seem to be the flavor of the month, so I want to take a minute to explain it.

I consider myself a feminist because I support the feminist ‘party line’: equal rights and opportunities for women and girls the world over. But also, I consider myself a feminist because I value femininity. I value my own femininity, and I value feminine thought and action wherever I see it, whether performed by female or male actors.

For the record, I also value masculinity. I believe there is power in balancing the two. When used in concert, masculinity and femininity have a good shot of resolving conflict and creating harmony – a better shot than either quality on its own. Thus, I believe that seeking a balance of masculinity and femininity is a worthy activity for individuals, partnerships, families, organizations, belief systems, governments and societies.

To me, balancing masculinity and femininity has little to do with gender “presentation”. By that, I mean that wearing clothes or performing behaviors that we associate with women (or with men) does not create the kind of balance I’m talking about. A woman can wear lipstick and still be masculine, or fix a car and still be feminine. A man can wear a suit in a feminine way, or kiss another man in a masculine way. 

Let me explain.

This is Not About Women and Men

Women are not always feminine, and men are not always masculine. Masculinity and femininity are qualities which can be expressed in infinite ways, and by all people (thus, transgender people, same-sex couples, and organizations or communities who happen to be comprised primarily of a single gender are at least as equipped to find “balance” as anybody else).

So here’s the rub: in the society where I grew up, and in most human societies at this moment in history, masculine qualities are generally considered to be of higher value than feminine qualities. Masculinity is associated with power and success, and femininity with weakness and ineptitude, to such a degree that we experience outrage, shock or disgust when power and success are projected by feminine actors, or in feminine ways. In other words: this psychological hiccup makes it so that we don’t like to see women in power, and we don’t like to see powerful men acting feminine.

I think that one little misjudgment is at the root of a lot of big problems. Luckily, I don’t happen to think that masculinity has anything to do with power, or that femininity has anything to do with weakness. Those associations are worse than useless: they hurt us, and they hurt our kids. 

What is Femininity?

That said, I don’t think it serves us, as a society, to seek gender homogeny; that is, to do away with all associations surrounding femininity and masculinity. I believe that the words “masculine” and “feminine” ought to mean something, and that we ought to come to broader (and more thoughtful) agreement about what they mean. So, here’s what they mean to me.

In my estimation, femininity has to do with openness, possibility, and connectivity. To be feminine is to acknowledge complexity and relatedness. Feminine thought makes connections between diverse ideas, and explores the “gray area” between distinctions. Feminine thought is nonlinear and inclusive: it is uninterested in boundaries, it leaps from topic to topic, it speaks in metaphor and symbolism, and it rarely (if ever) arrives at a completion point. Feminine thought is sourced primarily from the invisible world – that is, the world of thoughts, feelings, relationships, and the unknown.

Masculinity is about depth, finality, and division. To be masculine is to seek completion by eliminating possibilities. Masculine thought makes clear distinctions between concepts, in the interest of drawing a final conclusion. Masculine thought is linear: it establishes rules of engagement, proceeds logically from point A to point B, eliminates possible conflicts, and reaches a conclusion. Masculine thought is sourced primarily from the physical world – the world of facts, quantitative evidence, the objective, and the known.

Since I see sex in everything (and vice versa), it’s easy for me to think of masculinity and femininity in terms of male and female sexuality. Because of how vaginas work, female sexuality tends to be broad, fluid (hehe), and infinite. Because of how penises work, male sexuality tends to be focused, pointed (teehee), and finite. (Again, these are not “rules” but “tendencies”.)

(Tangent: There is a body of evidence that suggests that the qualities I’m associating with masculinity are side effects of testosterone. I do think there is some biological basis for the fact that we associate these qualities with men, and I find that interesting, but I think it’s counterproductive to get hung up on the issue. For one, women also have testosterone, and some of us have lots. For two, we humans have many biological tendencies that it does not work in our interest to indulge at this moment in history, such as war, eating raw meat, and having babies every two years from puberty until menopause.)

To illustrate that these ways of thinking are not ‘owned’ by men or women, let me point out that Einstein was an extremely feminine thinker. His genius was in drawing connections, and in describing the inter-relatedness of the world (e.g.: space and time influence each other). Ayn Rand, on the other hand, was an extremely masculine thinker. Her genius was in making clear divisions, and defining a strict moral code (e.g.: rational self-interest). Note that Einstein’s masterwork was called relativity, and Rand’s objectivism.

A big advantage of masculine thought is that it is a strong motivator for action. Before you build a building, you have to reach a conclusion about the “best” way to build it. If you’re thinking femininely, you have to acknowledge that there is no “best” way to build a building - the possibilities are endless and thus, choosing one is somewhat arbitrary.

A big disadvantage of masculine thought is that it has tunnel vision. It gets fixated on one thing at a time, and it’s not very good at adjusting for complexity and change. Feminine thought is extremely flexible; the instant that the current assumptions become obsolete, feminine thought is happy to discard them and move on to the next possibility.

So, a society that over-values masculine thought might, for example, be really good at building cities or increasing GDP, but not very good at handling complex “surprises”, like global climate change or impending economic collapse.

Sound familiar?

Seeking Balance

I am biologically female. I happen to enjoy many of the trappings of traditional feminine presentation (high heels, nail polish, rom coms), and I happen to have lots of qualities that I consider feminine (for example, I prefer to spend several hours every day thinking aimlessly about nothing in particular (songs are one of the byproducts of this activity).

I also have qualities that I consider masculine: I’m very ambitious and goal-oriented, I’m competitive, and I value (probably overly much) external achievement. When I care about something, I get fixated to the point of obsession. When I’m in charge of something, I am controlling and stubborn. I value quantitative evidence, and I believe that many kinds of decisions (in my own life and in public policy) ought to be based on the scientific method.

I tend to think that certain activities are best served by my feminine qualities (e.g.: songwriting, choosing friends and partners) and others by my masculine qualities (e.g.: balancing my checkbook, voting). When I’m in a masculine frame of mind, I am a terrible songwriter, because I’m too judgmental and narrow-minded to be experimental. When I’m in a feminine state of mind, I don’t attempt to balance my checkbook, because I lack focus, and get easily overwhelmed by competing thoughts and feelings.

So, I find that I’m most effective in the world when I have all of these characteristics available to me, and can choose which to apply to a given situation. I think that we’d all be better off if this was true of more people: e.g., if our world leaders could summon their feminine qualities when handling things like international diplomacy (which calls for an appreciation of relationship and complexity), and their masculine qualities when handling things like Ebola (which calls for planning and precision).

My Kind of Feminism

Here are some qualities that are nongendered: creativity, intelligence, confidence, power, charisma, strength, grace, beauty, imagination, joy, sensitivity, playfulness, sexiness, leadership, genius, anger, empathy, humor, kindness. These are human qualities, and associating them with a gender works in no one’s interest.

You can apply gender to these qualities; that is, you can be creative in a feminine way, or beautiful in a masculine way. But if any of us feels excluded from expressing these qualities because of our gender (or because of our race, or age, or any other reason), we all suffer.

So, like I said, I’m a feminist. This means that I support the pursuit of political, social and economic equality for women. But my kind of feminism also means that I support the pursuit of feminine thinking. I would like to see more women in politics; but I would also like to see politicians (of any gender) who are willing to acknowledge the complexity and relatedness of the problems we face. I would like to see a world where every child is afforded an education; but I’d also like to see a world where education is considered a lifelong experience that is intimately connected to home life, work life, and the livelihood of future generations. I’d like to see every woman have the right to make decisions about her reproductive health; but I’d also like to see a global conversation about sex, pregnancy, and parenthood that acknowledges the nuance of these issues, and the many complicated ways that they affect our society.

My kind of feminism means that I can be a woman who is powerful and assertive and stubborn. It means that I reserve the right to post selfies in which I do not look pretty. But it also means that I am willing to start conversations, like this one, which are open-ended and complex. It means that I value the pursuit of understanding as much as I value knowledge. It means that I’m interested in your response, even if it begins with “I don’t know”. And it means that if I want to stare at a wall and think aimlessly for a few hours, or feel some feelings, or daydream: goddamnit, I’ll stare at that wall. And I’ll consider it an absolutely vital activity, and an excellent use of my time.

If I could ask one thing from the parents and teachers of today, it wouldn’t be to avoid gendered toys, or to encourage your daughters to learn math and science. It would be this: applaud your kids when they reach a goal, get a good grade, or win a contest; but applaud them too for the power and genius of their femininity, in all of its meandering, metaphorical, infinite glory.



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New Rules for the Music Business

I launched my music career in 2006, after years of writing and performing just for fun. To my surprise and disappointment, I found that I had launched it to the strains of a funeral dirge. The Old Business was dead or dying, depending on who you asked. It was not yet clear whether there would be a New Business.

Thus, my business strategy for this past eight years has consisted mostly of guessing, experimenting, praying, and failing. Nobody I’ve met, no matter how experienced or successful, has had anything better than an informed guess about how to “make it” as an artist in the 21st century. It’s a strange and confusing new world.

However, thanks to some combination of luck, madness, and pigheadedness, I’ve been making a full-time living at this for about six years. And it’s starting to be kind of fun. I’m not saying I know what I’m doing, but I have ideas, and some people have asked me for advice. So what follows is my best guess at what the fuck is going on here. 

The Market and The Muse

A funny thing happened in the 20th century. Artists - known the world over to be fuzzy-headed, open-handed, penniless fools, with one eye on the sky and the other turned awkwardly inward – were forced to become businesspeople. And I don’t just mean that they had to handle money – I mean, they had to start thinking about markets.

Let me make clear for you how absurd this is. The difference between the concerns of pleasing a muse (which are largely abstract and unnameable), and the concerns of pleasing a market (which are largely concrete and quantifiable) are akin to the difference between a bird and a stone.  

When we serve the muse, we open ourselves up fearlessly to the woes and passions of the world, we experiment playfully and adventure boldly; we forfeit all allegiance to time, money, and external expectation. The poet Mary Oliver put it this way, “If I have a meeting with you at three o'clock, rejoice if I am late. Rejoice even more if I do not arrive at all.”

When we serve the market, we strive to make something “marketable”: ie: something that meets an identifiable need or demand, is understandable, and is most likely similar to something that came before it. We try to please the fans and the managers and label-heads, because they are providing the money. We cater, above all else, to time, money, and external expectation.

In short, the muse and the market are not just different, they are diametrically opposed. One asks us to proceed boldly, the other to proceed with caution.

But don’t despair, artists. That’s how it used to work. Then, the internet took everything we knew about markets, turned it upside down, shook it hard, and stole its lunch money.

New Rule #1: Create Ceaselessly

These days, instead of appealing to one big market, artists have the opportunity to appeal to any combination of an infinite number of small markets – which don’t even behave like markets, really, but like communities. Our work can reach these communities no matter where they are in the world, how old they are, or what radio station they listen to. And these communities are highly networked within and between each other.

In other words, there are now infinite markets, and infinite ways of marketing to them.

        Work ≠ money:

In the old business, every iteration of your work (every concert, CD, and photograph) could be expected to make you a fixed, knowable amount of money. Now that your work is being dumped into the bottomless maw of the internet, you can no longer count on it returning to you with a handful of cash.

A lot of artists aren’t ready to face this one, which is understandable. It’s devastating and terrifying to learn that the way you used to make money is not going to make you money anymore.

But let me state this clearly: the old world is not coming back. We can either learn to live in this one, or we can get a job.

Now, many of us have been lulled into believing that we already have a job. We do not. We have a calling. If you want to follow your calling, a steady paycheck is one of the many nice things that you’ll be asked to sacrifice.

That said, I believe that the problem of money is working itself out in some new and interesting ways. Fans don’t equal cash the way they once did (they don’t necessarily buy your records or go to your concerts, for example), but a fan is still a person who loves and values your work, and is probably willing to pay for it. Kickstarter, Patreon, and Bandcamp are a few of the models that allow us to experiment with turning fans into income, and I predict there will be many, many more in the coming years.

The trick is, they are not linear models. The more fans you have, the more money you can make - probably - but the ratio is not 1:1. The amount you get paid depends on lots of mushy, musey things, like how inspired your fans are, and how much they like you personally, and what they ate for breakfast.  

I happen to believe that good artists will always be able to make a living doing the thing they’re good at. Maybe not a great living, but a living. That said, I’ll get a job if I need to. I didn’t get into this for the money; and I’d wager that you didn’t either. Like Gillian Welch said, back in 2001 (AKA: the beginning of the end), “We’re gonna do it anyway, even if it doesn’t pay.”

      Two crazy masters:

So in the old business, the market was fairly bounded, and behaved in a somewhat predictable fashion. In the new business, it’s not, and it doesn’t.

We still have to cater to two masters (the market and the muse), but now, at least they are equally insane. They both require from us every ounce of boldness, passion and open-mindedness we can muster, and they both reward us in surprising and unpredictable ways.

We have to learn to treat our careers the way we treat our art: open ourselves up to mysterious forces, work fearlessly, and pray that we’ll be rewarded.

New Rule #2: Share Generously

I’m about to say something that’s gonna get me into trouble.

“Intellectual property” is an absurd concept that only a society of clueless, museless marketers could possibly conceive of. It’s an idea that serves markets, cripples muses, and is willfully ignorant of all of human history.

We are stealing from one another constantly and shamelessly, and that’s a blessed and beautiful thing. Every folk song is a mashup of all previous folk songs. Every film stands on the shoulders of all other films. Every sentence, poem and novel exists only for the creative gumption of all previous speakers of language, which is itself a collaborative invention of the entire human race. The whole history of human invention is characterized by a kind of joyful, infinite plagiarism.

Ideas are not commodities. They are made to be shared, not owned.  

That said, I do get the point. If somebody covered one of my songs and got it on the radio and made millions and didn’t pay me, I’d sue the bajeezus out of the motherfucker. If you’re going to turn my song into a commodity, I expect to paid as though it’s a commodity (even though deep in my heart, I know it’s not). 

BUT, if somebody covered one of my songs and put it on youtube, or wrote a song that was an homage to one of mine, or burned one of my CDs and gave it to a friend, or used a song of mine in their broke-ass indie film, I’d high five them. Why? Because there is a big difference between sharing someone else’s work and profiting off of someone else’s work. And it’s time for all of us to get real, real comfortable with the former.

(This, by the way, is why all of my music is released under a Creative Commons Non-Commercial License. Read about it!)

The old business was set up in such a way that pretty much every time somebody heard one of your songs, you could expect to get paid for it. The new business is not set up that way, and in my estimation, it’s not about to be. But at this point, I’m inclined not to mind. Remember: fans are worth money, just not in a linear way.  That means that I am downright celebratory about people sharing my work. I want my songs to go out there and make fans.

        How to Get Paid for Sharing:

I’d argue that the most effective way to rig this new system in our favor is to create as many opportunities as possible for our fans to pay us for what we do. I think most fans are willing to part with some money, as a show of gratitude for the work that moves them.

When it comes to asking for money, ask with humor, confidence, and a sense of abundance. Try to maintain the sense that what you’re offering is valuable and worthwhile. In other words, “Please buy my CD, which is not that great, so I can buy gas” is much less effective than “I made this album, and I think it’s beautiful, and I want you to have it. If you happen to have made some money, and you want me to have it, I think that’s beautiful too.”

Also, ask often, and in lots of different ways. My ‘asks’ range from the “donate” link at the bottom of this post, to Patreon and Kickstarter, to the pitch I do from the stage at every live show (where my CDs are available pay-what-you-please). For more on the ask, I recommend that you watch this video.

In other words, I don’t require anybody to pay me for any of the work I share. That said, I make it really easy and fun and warm-fuzzy-feeling for them to do so. This has been working for me for the past five years or so, and it works better all the time. I’d wager that if you’re committed, and passionate, and willing to apply a bit of your (abundant) creativity to this endeavor, it can work for you, too.

New Rule #3: Collaborate Selflessly

Back when there was one big multi-billion-dollar market, it made sense to get a little territorial. It made sense that artists talked shit about each other, got into public skirmishes, and were reticent to share their resources. They were competing for their little slice of a very big pie.

These days, however, there are infinite pies. That means that advocating for another artist’s work (or even just tolerating it) takes nothing away from your own work. It means that competition within the arts is outdated and counterproductive. It means that we have to take responsibility for our work, because our work lives or dies on its own merits. That’s true of everybody else’s work, too – regardless of our opinions about it (and we have many).

Furthermore, working with other artists grows both of our pies. Cross-promotion and collaboration are perhaps our very best shots at growing our fan base. Marketing dollars are getting less valuable all the time, but “social capital” is getting more valuable.

So here’s what I recommend: find artists you love (artistically and personally), and make something with them, or for them. Send them fan mail. Tell your fans about their records. Make them a casserole. If you need help, ask them. If they need help, give it to them. 

Furthermore, if you need help and they won’t provide it, be gracious. They are fighting their own battles and have their own reasons. Similarly, if somebody makes work you don’t like, or if somebody you don’t like has some success that seems unwarranted, let it slide. What’s more: applaud them. We are not competitors anymore, and we gain nothing by cutting each other down.

We are all engaged in the hard work of trying to make something beautiful in an often-ugly world. We wake up every day and fight the same demons - some external, most internal. Every scrap of encouragement we come across is infinitely valuable. We may be an introverted, neurotic, solitary bunch, but we need each other.

This is good business, but more than that, it’s good living. I don’t know about you, but I’m not willing to do this work if it means my heart has to shrivel up like a prune. I make music because music breaks me open to infinity and God and magic and all manner of foolish feelings. If that stops happening, I’ll quit. Until then, I plan to share those feelings with every artist who happens to incite them, and say THANK YOU to every one of my comrades who provides inspiration or encouragement or help or hope or humor (for example, The Wood Brothers, Devon Sproule, Milton, Anais Mitchell, Chris Kasper, Peter Mulvey, Vienna Teng, The Weepies, Seth Walker, Mark Erelli, Shovels & Rope, and David Torkanowsky. To name a few).

New Rule #4 (the most important rule): Be Grateful.

Keep this in mind at all times. It is a blessing to be a creative person. It is a luxury and a privilege to have a calling, to know what it is, and to have a shot at pursuing it. Fame and fortune are a completely ludicrous expectation, and we don’t deserve them. We don’t even deserve to live above the poverty line (at least, no more than anyone else does). 

Whatever bullshit, boring thing you have to do to make it work - be it hooking, tweeting, waiting tables, driving 60,000 miles a year - make peace with it. When you feel bitterness or disappointment nibbling at your heart, fend them off the way you always have: sing, play, and write. 

The world gave you your muse. It has already done right by you, and it owes you nothing else. 


So, let’s review.

The New Rules: 

1)        Create ceaselessly. Approach your career like another aspect of your art: it requires constant inspiration and experimentation, and provides unpredictable rewards.

2)         Share generously. As soon as it’s out of you, it belongs to the world. Write the song, record it, bless and release. Then, make it really, really easy for people who love it to give you money.

3)         Collaborate selflessly. Make friends with artists whose work you love. Make yourself available to them, and ask them for help. When they help or inspire you, be enthusiastically, vocally grateful. When they don’t, be gracious. Let your heart always be open to little birds who are the secrets of living (joyfully plagiarized from e. e. cummings). 

4)         Be Grateful. You are a lucky bastard, whether or not you ever sell a single record or ticket. When it’s not working the way you want it to, fall to your knees and give thanks for your ears and your muse and the infinite gifts of creating.

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